Fais dodo. Fais

Chansons Et Comptines

fais dodo

It is quite a leap, however, from an action done to soothe a baby, to an adult activity so very different from soothing a baby. Fais dodo, la lune dans le ciel-la Fais dodo, li brille pour toi. Creole Gumbo and All That Jazz: A New Orleans Seafood Cookbook. Faid dodo, dodo jist pour moi. There remains much to be said about this topic, and certainly both etymologies could have overlapped. Go to sleep, sleep without grief.

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Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère

fais dodo

The Premier Internet Portal to Western Square Dance Clubs and Square Dance Callers. Click to download a printable of. Thursday, April 11, 2p Chevron Stage. Joshua Clegg Caffery is a folklorist, musician, songwriter, and producer currently living in Breaux Bridge and currently English Department Chair at the Episcopal School of Acadiana. Like much folklore, the sleeping baby etymology of the fais do-do is usually reported as anonymous hearsay, even in books, articles, and scholarly reviews. After six months, you had a song that was really gelling.

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Fais Do

fais dodo

There is another explanation, however, that has been overlooked. In all cases, the call means virtually the same thing: approach your partner and circle around each other, back to back. Though Daigrepont appreciated having Sundays off during the hiatus, he recognizes the fruits of his labor by playing weekly, starting with the dance community. The Folk Etymology of the Fais Do-Do: A Note By Joshua Clegg Caffery By most accounts, the term fais do-do with do pronounced dough , in contemporary Louisiana parlance, refers to a public dance of some sort, often one held on a Sunday afternoon, usually involving an accordion and fiddle-led band and lyrics sung in vernacular Louisiana French. Since there were no rehearsals, Daigrepont introduced his new songs to the band before the gig and then gave it a shot during the second set.

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Chansons Et Comptines

fais dodo

These sources, however, are simply repeating the same apocryphal explanation known by almost anyone who lives in Southern Louisiana. Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Maman est en haut Qui fait du gâteau Papa est en bas Qui fait du chocolat Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Ta sœur est en haut Qui fait des chapeaux Ton frère est en bas Qui fait des nougats Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Ton cousin Gaston Fait des gros bonbons Ta cousine Charlotte Fait de la compote Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Texte et partition : Comptines. During one break, he met his future wife. Rather, it seems that writers, folklorists included, have uncritically accepted the etymology as given by community scholars and informants see Lindahl et al. Acadian Fiddler Dennis McGee and Acadian Dances.

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Fais do

fais dodo

The angles on high Are making a beautiful castle For the little brother Who sleeps so well Refrain 3. Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Maman est en haut, qui fait du gateau Papa est en bas, qui fait chocolat Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Ta soeur est en haut, qui fait des chapeaux Ton frère est en bas, qui fait du nougat Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Ton cousin Gaston fait des gros bonbons Ta cousine Charlotte fait de la compotte Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère Fais dodo, t'auras du lolo. To some extent, it seems very plausible, even probable. From Quadrille to Stomp: The Creole Origins of Jazz. It certainly makes for a good story, and it makes sense in a way , but there other possibilities. This article was first published in the 2012 Louisiana Folklore Miscellany.

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Fais Do

fais dodo

Maman est en haut Qui fait du gâteau Papa est en bas Qui fait du chocolat Refrain 2. Go to sleep, I love my little dear one. People of the Bayou: Cajun Life in Lost America. Indeed, the fais do-do is one of the first things visitors to French Louisiana learn about, along with a quaint story about how the expression evolved out of the practice of aged relatives lulling babies to sleep in the parc aux petits, a room reserved for sleepy infants in the back of Louisiana dance halls like a cry room in Catholic church, but meant to isolate the baby from the noise, rather than to isolate the grownups from the babies' noise. La cage aux chiens—at a French dancehall circa 1938, the single men stood in their own section looking for dance partners.

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